Posts Tagged ‘BPPV’

Vestibular Disorders on Facebook

If you’re like me, you’re always looking for other individuals who are dealing with problems similar with yours. This is one reason why we at LifeStyle started a Vestibular Support Group and why I post topics that send you away from my blog and to forums!

While perusing facebook today, I found the group page for the Vestibular Disorders Association, which is a very reliable site for information about vestibular disorders. On this facebook page, there are over 500 members, most with a balance disorder similar to yours.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/pages/Vestibular-Disorders-Association-VEDA/101876141561?ref=ts

Also, consider joining us on LifeStyle’s Facebook fan page as well. Learn health and wellness tips, find out about events at LifeStyle and learn more about vestibular disorders!

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/pages/Chicago-IL/LifeStyle-Physical-Therapy-Balance-Center/159337746404?ref=ts

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Vestibular Support Group

Join us for our next Vestibular Support Group meeting at our office in Lakeview in Chicago on Saturday, November 14th. Dr. Julia Rahn, Ph.D., will be discussing the psychological challenges of living with vestibular disorders/chronic illness.

11:30 – 12:00pm: Light refreshments

12:00 – 1:00pm: Meeting

For more information, location and to RSVP:

info@balancechicago.com or 773.525.5200

Tinnitus = Ear Ringing

From the American Tinnitus Association, tips to diagnose & understand your tinnitus:

  1. DO NOT panic. Tinnitus is usually not a sign of a serious, ongoing medical condition.
  2. CHECK things out. The sounds you hear may actually be normal sounds created by the human body at work.
  3. SEE an audiologist or ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT) interested and experienced in tinnitus treatment.
  4. REVIEW your current medications (prescription, over-the-counter, vitamins and other supplements) with your medical professional to find possible causes of your tinnitus.
  5. BE WARY of a hopeless diagnosis or physician advice like, “There’s nothing you can do about your tinnitus. Go home and live with it.”
  6. BE a detective. Keep track of what triggers your tinnitus.
  7. KEEP UP TO DATE about tinnitus. More and more research by the best and the brightest is bringing us closer to successful treatments and cures for tinnitus.

http://www.ata.org/tinnitus-tips

One Patient’s First Trip to PT for Vestibular Weakness

Here’s a great example of one woman’s first trip to see a PT for vestibular weakness (BPPV). It’s a forum, so you can even respond to her post about your own experiences! All you need to do is sign up – it’s FREE!

http://boards.webmd.com/webx?THDX@@.89afaa60!thdchild=.89afaa60

How to Prevent the Elderly from Falling

Here’s some more great tips from eHow (I’ve edited it a bit to pertain to our site – this has to do with the elderly more than just dizzy patients).

1) The house of the elderly should be well-lighted. Rugs and carpets should be kept away and or well tacked. Railings should be present at stairways and even the bathroom.

2) Walkways should be smooth and free from obstructions. Toys and other unnecessary things around the living room should be kept lest these could cause the elderly to slip and fall.

3) Electrical cords and even telephone cords and chargers should be kept and or set aside in order not to block the walkways.

4) Do not let the elderly climb the stairs alone. Make sure they wear a non-skid sole shoes.

5) Make sure the elderly can access his/her medicine(s) easily.

6) Check with the doctor on the medicines whether these could cause dizziness to the elderly. Have their eyesight, hearing and blood pressure checked since these could be one of the causes for the elderly to fall and be seriously injured.

http://www.ehow.com/how_4469891_prevent-elderly-falling.html

Vestibular Migraines

A vestibular migraine is a migraine that is associated with vestibular symptoms. Migraines usually precede the vestibular symptoms.

headache

Symptoms include vertigo, tinnitus and possible temporary hearing loss, auras (visual disturbances that can include flashing lights or blind spots), light sensitivity and loss of balance. 

One of the best things you can do to avoid migraines is to avoid your triggers. It may take some time to adjust your life to figure out what may cause these triggers. Some common triggers include heat, stress, and lack of sleep or food. Others have noted chocolate, alcohol, smoking, artificial sweeteners, MSG, and contraceptives as triggers.

Is it BPPV?

The symptoms of BPPV can mimic other disorders: dizziness, nausea, loss of balance. How do you know if what you have is BPPV?

1) When you get dizzy, it is not permanent. It only lasts for a short while (seconds to minutes).

2) Your dizziness can be onset from your head movement – whether it’s looking up or down, turning over in bed, or other sudden head motion.

3) After this brief burst of dizziness, you may be nauseous for hours.

4) You don’t have any ringing in your ears or hearing loss associated with these bursts of dizziness.

5) The room is spinning.