Posts Tagged ‘exercise’

Vestibular Disorders on Facebook

If you’re like me, you’re always looking for other individuals who are dealing with problems similar with yours. This is one reason why we at LifeStyle started a Vestibular Support Group and why I post topics that send you away from my blog and to forums!

While perusing facebook today, I found the group page for the Vestibular Disorders Association, which is a very reliable site for information about vestibular disorders. On this facebook page, there are over 500 members, most with a balance disorder similar to yours.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/pages/Vestibular-Disorders-Association-VEDA/101876141561?ref=ts

Also, consider joining us on LifeStyle’s Facebook fan page as well. Learn health and wellness tips, find out about events at LifeStyle and learn more about vestibular disorders!

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/pages/Chicago-IL/LifeStyle-Physical-Therapy-Balance-Center/159337746404?ref=ts

Advertisements

Tinnitus = Ear Ringing

From the American Tinnitus Association, tips to diagnose & understand your tinnitus:

  1. DO NOT panic. Tinnitus is usually not a sign of a serious, ongoing medical condition.
  2. CHECK things out. The sounds you hear may actually be normal sounds created by the human body at work.
  3. SEE an audiologist or ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT) interested and experienced in tinnitus treatment.
  4. REVIEW your current medications (prescription, over-the-counter, vitamins and other supplements) with your medical professional to find possible causes of your tinnitus.
  5. BE WARY of a hopeless diagnosis or physician advice like, “There’s nothing you can do about your tinnitus. Go home and live with it.”
  6. BE a detective. Keep track of what triggers your tinnitus.
  7. KEEP UP TO DATE about tinnitus. More and more research by the best and the brightest is bringing us closer to successful treatments and cures for tinnitus.

http://www.ata.org/tinnitus-tips

Invisible Illness Seminars

These seminars are FREE from Invisible Illness Week and they upload straight into your iTunes. Some seminars include:

“Understanding how we Uniquely Deal with Difficulties in Life”

“Helping Others Undertand Your Pain”

“When Your Child is Chronically Ill”

“Simplifying Your Home and Housework”

“Finding Health Insurance with a Pre-Existing Condition”

http://www.apple.com/search/ipoditunes/?q=invisible+illness

Good Luck!

Although our blog is usually about vestibular disorders, we want to give a special shout out to our               img1                      Chicago 2009 Marathoners. We have a number of  runners we work with through the Imerman Angels, the Chicago Tri Club and the National Runaway Marathon Teams who will be running the 2009 Chicago Marathon this Sunday, October 11th.

GOOD LUCK !!!!!!!!!!!

Treatment of Tinnitus

ears ringingFrom the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders  

Although there is no cure for tinnitus, scientists and doctors have discovered several treatments that may give you some relief. Not every treatment works for everyone, so you may need to try several to find the ones that help.

Treatments can include:     

  • Hearing aids. Many people with tinnitus also have a hearing loss. Wearing a hearing aid makes it easier for some people to hear the sounds they need to hear by making them louder. The better you hear other people talking or the music you like, the less you notice your tinnitus.
  • Maskers. Maskers are small electronic devices that use sound to make tinnitus less noticeable. Maskers do not make tinnitus go away, but they make the ringing or roaring seem softer. For some people, maskers hide their tinnitus so well that they can barely hear it.Some people sleep better when they use maskers. Listening to static at a low volume on the radio or using bedside maskers can help. These are devices you can put by your bed instead of behind your ear. They can help you ignore your tinnitus and fall asleep.
  • Medicine or drug therapy. Some medicines may ease tinnitus. If your doctor prescribes medicine to treat your tinnitus, he or she can tell you whether the medicine has any side effects.
  • Tinnitus retraining therapy. This treatment uses a combination of counseling and maskers. Otolaryngologists and audiologists help you learn how to deal with your tinnitus better. You may also use maskers to make your tinnitus less noticeable. After a while, some people learn how to avoid thinking about their tinnitus. It takes time for this treatment to work, but it can be very helpful.
  • Counseling. People with tinnitus may become depressed. Talking with a counselor or people in tinnitus support groups may be helpful.
  • Relaxing. Learning how to relax is very helpful if the noise in your ears frustrates you. Stress makes tinnitus seem worse. By relaxing, you have a chance to rest and better deal with the sound.

http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/noiseinear.htm#treat

Is it BPPV?

The symptoms of BPPV can mimic other disorders: dizziness, nausea, loss of balance. How do you know if what you have is BPPV?

1) When you get dizzy, it is not permanent. It only lasts for a short while (seconds to minutes).

2) Your dizziness can be onset from your head movement – whether it’s looking up or down, turning over in bed, or other sudden head motion.

3) After this brief burst of dizziness, you may be nauseous for hours.

4) You don’t have any ringing in your ears or hearing loss associated with these bursts of dizziness.

5) The room is spinning.

Supporting Your Spouse When they Have a Vestibular Disorder

1. Communicate with your spouse. Vestibular disorders are invisible, so you may not be able to see symptoms, which can be frustrating. It is important to openly communicate with your spouse, listen to what they are going through, ask questions and explain how YOU feel.

2. Go to doctor’s appointments with your spouse. This will give you a better understanding of the prognosis of this balance disorder and an opportunity to ask questions your spouse may not be able to answer.

3. Go to support group meetings with your spouse. This will give you a chance to meet other individuals who are playing the role of the supporting spouse.

4. Make sure YOU have a support system. Whether it be friends, family, or other spouses like yourself, it is important that you have someone that you can vent to.

5. Take time out for YOU. Being someone’s support system is tiring. Make sure to go golfing, get that massage or take that shopping trip that rewards you!