Posts Tagged ‘health’

4/17/10: Support Group for Dizzy and Inner Ear Balance Disorders

Join us on Saturday, April 17th for our Vestibular Support Group, for individuals with dizziness, vertigo, or balance issues. This support group is set up as an open forum to meet other individuals in the community with vestibular disorders. We will also have Physical Therapists certified in vestibular rehabilitation available to answer any questions you may have about vestibular disorders or therapy.

We have a special guest speaker who will teach us how Tai Chi benefits individuals with dizziness and balance disorders as well as some basic moves.

If you are affected or have been affected by any of the following, please consider joining us:

  • BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo)
  • Peripheral or central vestibulopathy
  • Vestibular migraine
  • Meniere’s Disease
  • Labrynthitis
  • Tinnitus

We would love all of those affected by vestibular disorders to join us! Friends and family, as well as other support systems, are  welcome.

Where: 3130 N Lincoln Avenue in Chicago, IL (60657).

When: Refreshments will be served at 11:30am. The meeting will begin at 12pm and will last for approximately one hour.

To RSVP, please call: 773-525-5200.

Spring 2010 Vestibular Support Group

Join us on Saturday, April 17th for our Vestibular Support Group, located at our office at 3130 N Lincoln Avenue in Chicago, IL (60657). Refreshments will be served at 11:30am and the meeting will begin at 12pm and will last for approximately one hour.

We would love all of those affected by vestibular disorders to join us! Friends and family, as well as other support systems, are  welcome.

To RSVP, please call: 773-525-5200.

Tai Chi and Balance Disorders

A recent study conducted in 2008-2009 showed that the martial art practice Tai Chi is an effective treatment for people with vestibular disorders.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi is an practice incorporating slow movements of the body into different postures using your own body’s coordination. According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology, Tai Chi is helpful for those with balance disorders because it helps people concentrate on their own coordination.

http://www.medindia.net/news/Tai-Chi-Proved-Effective-Against-Dizziness-Balance-Disorders-59053-1.htm

Muscle Cramps – What are They?

A friend of mine was running the other day and caught a cramp in her leg. We were talking about her leg cramps, which turn out to happen quite often, and she asked me what exactly is a cramp and how she can avoid it in the future. I thought I’d share it with my readers!

When you exercise your muscles contract and then relax in quick succession. A cramp happens when your muscle contracts but does not relax, and becomes hardened. It may be difficult, once you have a cramp, to relax the muscle and pain may result.

Some causes of cramps include:

  • Injury to the muscle: Muscles may spasm, and then cramp, around the site of an injury to stabilize the injury site.
  • Nocturnal cramps:  Small movements during the night of muscles causes shortening of the muscles which lead to cramps – which is why you may wake up in the middle of the night with a Charley Horse!
  • Dehydration: Fluid loss during exercise causes the muscles to shorten up and tense up. Cramps in seniors may result from poor fluid intake.

Other causes for cramps can be found on the website provided below, but my friend’s reason was most likely from dehydration. For cramps caused during exercise, it is essential that you do a proper warm up and cool down and make sure you get plenty of fluids before, during and after your workout (also can be found on the website provided below). And make sure you stretch before and after your workout!

http://www.medicinenet.com/muscle_cramps/article.htm

Waking up Dizzy?

Our new patients in their evaluation often tell us that the initial way that they realized that they had a vestibular disorder was that they turned over in bed and felt a wave of dizziness come over them. This is a key indicator that our patient may have BPPV. BPPV is treatable through physical therapy and through maneuvers like the Epley Maneuver.

Check out the other signs of BPPV:

  • Dizziness
  • A sense that you or your surroundings are spinning or moving (vertigo)
  • Lightheadedness
  • Unsteadiness
  • A loss of balance
  • Blurred vision associated with the sensation of vertigo
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/vertigo/DS00534/DSECTION=symptoms

    Do you have a Balance Disorder? Take this Self-Test

    Are you concerned that you may have a balance disorder? Take this self-test to determine whether you should go see an ENT or neurologist about a potential balance/neurological disorder.

    http://resourcesonbalance.com/patient_info/printout.aspx

    If you answer “yes” to one or more of the questions, you could be at risk. Make sure you consult with your physician or an ENT/neurologist.

    Testing and Evaluating Your Dizziness

    Every therapist who tests people for balance disorders and dizziness will use similar tests. Here are four examples of the tests that are used, which may include additional explanation if there’s an abundance of scientific terms. Explanations/definitions are in italics and I have edited the copy for better reading comprehension.

    Oculomotor examination

    Assess for an internuclear ophthalmoplegia [eye weakness] and gaze-dependent nystagmus [involuntary movement in the eye that indicates neurological abnormality]. Nystagmus of peripheral [inner ear] origin typically is unidirectional. Nystagmus of brainstem or cerebellar (ie. central) origin may be bidirectional and have more than one direction. Pure vertical nystagmus almost always is a sign of brainstem disease and not a labyrinthine [inner ear] disorder.

    Station (Romberg)

    The…Romberg test is having the patient stand heel to toe with 1 foot in front of the other; this test is required to detect abnormalities in younger patients.

    Fukuda test (stepping test of Unterberger)

    The patient is asked to step in place for 20-30 seconds. Rotation of the patient may indicate a unilateral loss of vestibular tone.

    Dix-Hallpike maneuver

    The Dix-Hallpike maneuver is one of the most important tests for patients who experience true vertigo. This test involves having the patient lie back suddenly with the head turned to one side. The test results are considered abnormal if the patient reports vertigo and exhibits a characteristic torsional (ie. rotary) nystagmus that starts a few seconds after the patient lies back (latency), lasts 40-60 seconds, reverses when the patient sits up, and fatigues with repetition.

    For more information and more tests:

    http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/856440-overview