Posts Tagged ‘inner ear’

4/17/10: Support Group for Dizzy and Inner Ear Balance Disorders

Join us on Saturday, April 17th for our Vestibular Support Group, for individuals with dizziness, vertigo, or balance issues. This support group is set up as an open forum to meet other individuals in the community with vestibular disorders. We will also have Physical Therapists certified in vestibular rehabilitation available to answer any questions you may have about vestibular disorders or therapy.

We have a special guest speaker who will teach us how Tai Chi benefits individuals with dizziness and balance disorders as well as some basic moves.

If you are affected or have been affected by any of the following, please consider joining us:

  • BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo)
  • Peripheral or central vestibulopathy
  • Vestibular migraine
  • Meniere’s Disease
  • Labrynthitis
  • Tinnitus

We would love all of those affected by vestibular disorders to join us! Friends and family, as well as other support systems, are  welcome.

Where: 3130 N Lincoln Avenue in Chicago, IL (60657).

When: Refreshments will be served at 11:30am. The meeting will begin at 12pm and will last for approximately one hour.

To RSVP, please call: 773-525-5200.

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Tai Chi and Balance Disorders

A recent study conducted in 2008-2009 showed that the martial art practice Tai Chi is an effective treatment for people with vestibular disorders.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi is an practice incorporating slow movements of the body into different postures using your own body’s coordination. According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology, Tai Chi is helpful for those with balance disorders because it helps people concentrate on their own coordination.

http://www.medindia.net/news/Tai-Chi-Proved-Effective-Against-Dizziness-Balance-Disorders-59053-1.htm

The Inner Ear and Balance in 90 Seconds

Technology never ceases to amaze me. The amount of information we all have at our fingertips is astounding.

Learn more about your inner ear and how it affects your balance in this quick, 90 second video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbKU0AbbARg

Enjoy!

Testing and Evaluating Your Dizziness

Every therapist who tests people for balance disorders and dizziness will use similar tests. Here are four examples of the tests that are used, which may include additional explanation if there’s an abundance of scientific terms. Explanations/definitions are in italics and I have edited the copy for better reading comprehension.

Oculomotor examination

Assess for an internuclear ophthalmoplegia [eye weakness] and gaze-dependent nystagmus [involuntary movement in the eye that indicates neurological abnormality]. Nystagmus of peripheral [inner ear] origin typically is unidirectional. Nystagmus of brainstem or cerebellar (ie. central) origin may be bidirectional and have more than one direction. Pure vertical nystagmus almost always is a sign of brainstem disease and not a labyrinthine [inner ear] disorder.

Station (Romberg)

The…Romberg test is having the patient stand heel to toe with 1 foot in front of the other; this test is required to detect abnormalities in younger patients.

Fukuda test (stepping test of Unterberger)

The patient is asked to step in place for 20-30 seconds. Rotation of the patient may indicate a unilateral loss of vestibular tone.

Dix-Hallpike maneuver

The Dix-Hallpike maneuver is one of the most important tests for patients who experience true vertigo. This test involves having the patient lie back suddenly with the head turned to one side. The test results are considered abnormal if the patient reports vertigo and exhibits a characteristic torsional (ie. rotary) nystagmus that starts a few seconds after the patient lies back (latency), lasts 40-60 seconds, reverses when the patient sits up, and fatigues with repetition.

For more information and more tests:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/856440-overview

Vestibular Support Group

Join us for our next Vestibular Support Group meeting at our office in Lakeview in Chicago on Saturday, November 14th. Dr. Julia Rahn, Ph.D., will be discussing the psychological challenges of living with vestibular disorders/chronic illness.

11:30 – 12:00pm: Light refreshments

12:00 – 1:00pm: Meeting

For more information, location and to RSVP:

info@balancechicago.com or 773.525.5200

The Inner Ear

The Ear

The Ear

The ear consists of the outer ear, which collects and directs soundwaves into the middle ear. The middle ear collects these soundwaves and transforms them into vibrations which are passed into the inner ear. The inner ear propogates these vibrations, in the cochlea, as waves in fluid and membranes, and transmits them as nerve impulses that are transmitted to the brain through the auditory nerve.(1)
Inner Ear

Inner Ear

This inner ear, or bony labyrinth, consists of the cochlea (which transmits soundwaves to the nerve impulse to be transmitted to the brain) and the vestibular system. The vestibular system controls an individual’s balance and is comprised of three semicircular canals and the otoliths (utricle and saccule). The semicircular canals detect rotational movement while the otoliths detect linear movements. (2)