Posts Tagged ‘Meniere’s Disease’

Reminder: Vestibular Support Group

If you are dizzy, have vertigo or a loss of balance, join us for our vestibular support group on Saturday, November 14th from 11:30am – 1:00pm. We will be joined by Dr. Julia Rahn, clinical psychologist at Flourish Studios, who will discuss the psychological challenges of living with a chronic illness, including vestibular disorders.

This support group is FREE and a great way to meet others with similar disorders and challenges. RSVP: info@balancechicago.com

Located at:

LifeStyle Physical Therapy & Balance Center

3130 N Lincoln Avenue

Chicago, IL 60657

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Vestibular Disorders on Facebook

If you’re like me, you’re always looking for other individuals who are dealing with problems similar with yours. This is one reason why we at LifeStyle started a Vestibular Support Group and why I post topics that send you away from my blog and to forums!

While perusing facebook today, I found the group page for the Vestibular Disorders Association, which is a very reliable site for information about vestibular disorders. On this facebook page, there are over 500 members, most with a balance disorder similar to yours.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/pages/Vestibular-Disorders-Association-VEDA/101876141561?ref=ts

Also, consider joining us on LifeStyle’s Facebook fan page as well. Learn health and wellness tips, find out about events at LifeStyle and learn more about vestibular disorders!

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/pages/Chicago-IL/LifeStyle-Physical-Therapy-Balance-Center/159337746404?ref=ts

Nystagmus?

You will most likely hear the word “nystagmus” used when being evaluated by your physical therapist for vestibular disorders (i.e. BPPV). Nystagmus is the involuntary movement of the eye, which can be caused by the impairment of the vestibular system such as BPPV and Meniere’s  (it can also be caused by a slew of other disorders).

With BPPV, an inner ear disorder, the eye will move towards the affected ear. This will be noticeable to your physical therapist when they do your evaluation.

Myths About Vertigo Dispelled

Myth #1: Relaxation will resolve anxiety-caused dizziness.

In fact, if a person with vertigo becomes anxious, it is actually easy to link anxiety to the presence of the vertigo.

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Myth #2: Vertigo is all in your head because you have an overactive imagination.

In fact, vertigo is all in your head; however, probably not because of your imagination. The symptoms of dizziness and unsteady movement are quite real. Whether it is BPPV (brain) or Meniere’s (inner ear), the vertigo is spiraling from the area above the neck.

Myth #3: Vertigo is just part of the aging process.

In fact, age has very little, if nothing, to do with vertigo. There are a number of causes, but age is not one of them. Some causes include injury, degenerative issues and a litany of other medical problems. Dizziness is not normal at any age. It is a sign that something is wrong.

Myth #4: Vertigo comes from a hormone imbalance.

In fact, you could have a hormone imbalance due to any number of medical issues, but this imbalance rarely produces vertigo.

 

**Borrowed from eHow: http://www.ehow.com/about_5230999_vertigo-patient-information.html

Dr. Hain and the 3rd Vestibular Support Group

Our most recent Vestibular Support Group, held at LifeStyle’s office in Chicago, increased in attendance and we had our first guest speaker, Dr. Timothy Hain. Chicago’s “dizzy doctor”, as many patients call him, is a neurologist with Chicago Dizziness and Hearing as well as a Professor of Neurology and Otolaryngology at Northwestern University Medical School.

Dr. Hain began his discussion with an overview of the different definitions of dizziness and the reasons for dizziness. Patients go to doctors for many reasons and use the term “dizziness” and it could refer to many things, whether it’s vertigo, or a sensation of motion, ataxia, an unsteadiness, or lightheadedness/faintness.

dizzyAlmost 50% of dizziness stems from your ear, but that means that about 50% of dizziness stems from something else (including brain trauma, psychological reasons, and other medical reasons).

Dr. Hain then gave an overview of BPPV, Meniere’s disease, vestibular neuritis and bilateral vestibular loss. He gave great insight and even case examples about the different vestibular disorders. Dr. Hain discussed studies that are being conducted on mice (no humans yet) to regenerate damaged, non-working hair cells within ones ear – which are the cells that are the sensory receptors for the vestibular system – humans are not able to regenerate damanged cells while birds are able to.

Dr. Hain also discussed the use of Betahistine in the treatment of Meniere’s Disease – while not FDA legal in the US, the Europeans widely use the product. For an overview and Dr. Hain’s review of the drug, please go to: http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/treatment/serc.html

For more information on Chicago’s VSG, please send an email to: info@balancechicago.com.

Reminder: Vestibular Support Group on Saturday!

Our Vestibular Support Group will be held this Saturday, August 15th at LifeStyle: 3130 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, IL 60657. We already have a fantastic RSVP list but would like to have more. Dr. Timothy Hain, a renowned neurologist from Chicago Dizziness and Hearing, will be speaking  at the meeting. Bring your family, friends, and support systems. Light refreshments at 11:30am, meeting starts at 12:00pm.

For more information or to RSVP, contact info@balancechicago.com.

October 29, 1916

On October 29, 1916, an article was published in the NY Times that states that from the research and works of several individuals, it has been verified that vertigo (or seasickness as they call it) results from an imbalance in the inner ear. In the article it states that vertigo was often thought of as an intestinal or digestive disorder brought upon by indigestion or stomachaches.

In 1900, the relationship between vertigo and the inner ear was first established and many tests ensued. In one experiment, animals were rocked on a moving floor that simulated a rolling sea and it resulted in the animals getting seasick. The head researcher, Kreidl, then severed the eighth nerve (the acoustic/auditory nerve). The same experiment was then conducted on the moving floor and the animals did not get sick.

1916 was the beginning of the acknowledgement that vertigo was the distinct result of the “disturbance of the vestibular apparatus”.  A lot of things were proven in the years leading up to 1916, such as champagne giving relief to vertigo symptoms (see last paragraph of the article) and the causes of vertigo “no longer be[ing] regarded as vague or mysterious”.

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=950CE1DA113CE733A2575AC2A9669D946796D6CF